A Close Call, 1965
pine, spruce, cloth, fur, paper and plate glass
15 x 14 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches

Death Ship of No Port with a List, 1969
redwood, pine, fir, walnut, and ebony
37 x 12 x 11 1/2 inches

Death Ship of No Port, 1967
3 color lithograph on Arches paper
18 x 24 inches, edition of 50
HCWr 04

Hard of Hearing Object, 1961
wood, metal, acrylic paint
24 1/2 x 20 x 20 inches
HCWs 20

A Family Tree, 1964
plate glass, wood, carpet and copper tubing
15 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches
HCWs 21

Nouveau Rat Trap, 1965
plywood, rosewood, and metal
13 x 34 x 7 1/2 inches
HCWs 22

Ebony, 1968
pine, brass
14 3/4 x 16 x 13 inches
HCWs 19

Mr. Goo, 1966
bronze with chrome plating
14 x 11 x 4 5/8 inches
HCWs 23

Pistol, 1962
wood, metal, enamel paint
20 x 2 3/4 x 7 inches

The Big Change, 1963
laminated fir plywood
56 x 12 x 12 inches

 

The Last Ray of Hope, 1968
pine, linoleum, galvanized sheet metal, plate glass, one pair of leather shoes
16 7/8 x 25 3/4 x 16 3/8 inches

 

The Pillar of Truth, 1962
cast aluminum, red oak, pine, walnut
25 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches

Untitled, 1965
ash, plate glass, photo and paper flowers
18 x 14 x 6 inches

World's Strongest Glue, 1966
bronze
16 x 11 x 12 inches

Press Release

 
Work from the 1960's
 
Jan 5 - Jan 28, 1995
 
 
Starting January 5th, 1995, the Frumkin/Adams Gallery will show a group of H.C. Westermann sculptures from the decade 1960-1970. This was a key period for the artist and in it he developed most of the motifs and materials that he used over the balance of his career. This show is a part of a 1960's overview and will be followed in February by a related show called California in the '60s: Funk Revisited.
 
The Westermann show will consist of about 15 sculptures from the '60s including his well-known "The Big Change," as well as a number of glasses boxes, wood sculptures and bronzes. In addition the exhibition will include Westermann's first lithographs from the mid-60s as well as the suite of lithographs executed at Tamarind later in the decade. 
 
The Westermann exhibition is mostly drawn from private collections in the East and includes a number of works seen in the Whitney retrospective of 1979. Since the artist's death in 1981, Westermann's reputation has been in the process of re-evaluation. Jonathan Fineberg in a new book suggests that he "profoundly influenced such as William Wiley and the young Chicagoans of the nascent Hairy Who, in the sixties and (more or-less directly) many important figurative artist in New York in the seventies and eighties, especially David Salle and Keith Haring."
 
Exhibition Checklist
 
1. Pistol, 1962
wood, metal, enamel paint
20 x 2 3/4 x 7 inches
 
2. A Family Tree, 1964
plate glass, wood, carpet and copper tubing
15 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches
HCWs 21
 
3. The Pillar of Truth, 1962
cast aluminum, red oak, pine, walnut
25 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches
 
4. World's Strongest Glue, 1966
bronze
16 x 11 x 12 inches
 
5. Untitled, 1965
ash, plate glass, photo and paper flowers
18 x 14 x 6 inches
 
6. Nouveau Rat Trap, 1965
plywood, rosewood, and metal
13 x 34 x 7 1/2 inches
HCWs 22
 
7. A Close Call, 1965
pine, spruce, cloth, fur, paper and plate glass
15 x 14 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches
 
8. Mr. Goo, 1966
bronze with chrome plating
14 x 11 x 4 5/8 inches
HCWs 23
 
9. Hard of Hearing Object, 1961
wood, metal, acrylic paint
24 1/2 x 20 x 20 inches
HCWs 20
 
10. Ebony, 1968
pine, brass
14 3/4 x 16 x 13 inches
HCWs 19
 
11. The Big Change, 1963
laminated fir plywood
56 x 12 x 12 inches
 
12. The Last Ray of Hope, 1968
pine, linoleum, galvanized sheet metal, plate glass, one pair of leather shoes
16 7/8 x 25 3/4 x 16 3/8 inches
 
13. Death Ship of No Port with a List, 1969
redwood, pine, fir, walnut, and ebony
37 x 12 x 11 1/2 inches
 
14. Death Ship of No Port, 1967
3 color lithograph on Arches paper
18 x 24 inches, edition of 50
HCWr 04